Engineering

Northwestern’s pre-engineering program is designed for the students who want to begin their college experience at a liberal arts college and then, after two or three years, transfer to a department of engineering at a university to complete the sequence of technical courses required for a degree in a specific field of engineering.

Northwestern College-Washington University dual-degree program

Why not have the best of both worlds? Become a liberally educated engineer. Northwestern is affiliated with Washington University in St. Louis in offering a dual degree. A student in the dual-degree program spends three years at Northwestern College and two years at Washington.

In completing the dual-degree program, students obtain both a broad Christian liberal arts education from Northwestern College and in-depth engineering expertise from Washington University. The student will receive two degrees - a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern College and an engineering undergraduate degree from the University of Washington - upon completion of the combined program. Engineering fields offered are Biomedical, Chemical, Computer, Electrical, Mechanical, and Systems Science & Engineering.

Students also have the option of spending three years at Washington University and completing three degrees, a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern College, an engineering undergraduate degree from Washington, and an engineering master’s degree from Washington.

Washington University’s admission requirements are listed at: https://engineering.wustl.edu/prospective-students/dual-degree/Pages/default.aspx

Each student transferring to Washington University will complete the following requirements at Northwestern College:

All Engineering Programs (required classes to transfer):

MAT 211 - Calculus II
A study of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integration, sequences, series, polar coordinates and conic sections.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
MAT 212 - Calculus III
A study of the cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, vectors in two dimensions and three dimensions, vector valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector calculus.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT211 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
MAT 312 - Differential Equations
A study of the elementary theory, methods of solution, and applications of differential equations, which may include topics such as first order ordinary differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, series solutions, variation of parameters, Laplace Transforms, linear systems, partial differential equations, and Fourier Series.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT211 or permission of department chair.(3 credits)
PHY 211SN - Classical Physics I
(4 credits)(NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Though all students are welcome in this calculus-based, IGE physics course, this is the first of a two course sequence designed for math, science, and engineering majors and others who have taken or are taking calculus and intend to apply to medical or graduate school. This course includes the following topics: kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, gravity, oscillations, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MAT 112, or consent of the department chair.
PHY 212 - Classical Physics II
A continuation of Classical Physics I. Topics will include simple harmonic oscillation, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetism.Prerequisite: successful completion of PHY211 with a grade of C- or better.(4 credits)
CSC 171QR - Computer Science I
(4 credits) (NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning) This is the first in a two-semester sequence of courses that introduces students to fundamental aspects of the field of computing; focusing on problem-solving, software design concepts and their realization as computer programs. Topics include procedural abstraction, control structures, iteration, data types and their representation. An introduction to a high-level language, for the purpose of gaining mastery of these principles, will be provided in lectures and hands-on laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 510 or above), or a passing score on the MAT090 placement exam.
CHE 111 - General Chemistry
An introductory course in chemistry that emphasizes physical and inorganic concepts, problems and calculations. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gases, thermochemistry, theories of atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The general chemistry sequence (Chemistry 111 and Chemistry 112) is recommended for students with good math / science preparations who intend to proceed to advanced courses in chemistry, the biological sciences or engineering. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and ACT math score of at least 24 (SAT 570 or above). (4 credits)
NOTE: All programs require taking more science electives, an English composition course, and additional coursework (related to your NWC major) such that 90+ credits transfer.

In addition, the following program-specific requirements apply:

For Biomedical Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics, Chemistry, and Mathematics
Required additional classes:
CHE 112 - General Chemistry
A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry.Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor.(4 credits)
BIO 115SN - General Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
An introduction to molecular and cellular biology, with an examination of the processes common to living organisms and an introduction to the diversity of life, emphasizing unicellular organisms. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of macromolecules, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, meiosis, genetics, mechanisms of evolutionary change, and Christian perspectives on evolutionary biology. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

For Chemical Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biochemistry and Chemistry
Required additional classes:
CHE 112 - General Chemistry
A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry.Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor.(4 credits)
CHE 321 - Organic Chemistry
The study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis.Prerequisites: CHE102 or 112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
BIO 115SN - General Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
An introduction to molecular and cellular biology, with an examination of the processes common to living organisms and an introduction to the diversity of life, emphasizing unicellular organisms. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of macromolecules, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, meiosis, genetics, mechanisms of evolutionary change, and Christian perspectives on evolutionary biology. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

For Computer Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biophysics, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics
Required additional classes:
CSC 172WI - Computer Science II
(4 credits)(Writing intensive) This course moves students into the domain of software design, introducing principles that are necessary for solving large problems. Here, the classical software design process serves as a basis for treating such topics as abstract data types, specifications, complexity analysis and file organization. Basic data structures and transformations are introduced as representative of the fundamental tools that are used to aid in this process. A high-level language will be used for the purpose of gaining mastery of these principles through lectures and independent hands-on laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: CSC171.

For Electrical Engineering

Recommended NWC major:
Mathematics
Required additional classes:
None

For Environmental Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics, and Chemistry
Required additional classes:
CHE 112 - General Chemistry
A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry.Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor.(4 credits)
CHE 321 - Organic Chemistry
The study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis.Prerequisites: CHE102 or 112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
BIO 115SN - General Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
An introduction to molecular and cellular biology, with an examination of the processes common to living organisms and an introduction to the diversity of life, emphasizing unicellular organisms. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of macromolecules, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, meiosis, genetics, mechanisms of evolutionary change, and Christian perspectives on evolutionary biology. (4 credits) (NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

For Mechanical Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biophysics and Mathematics
Required additional classes:
None

For Systems Science & Engineering

Recommended NWC majors:
Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics
Required additional classes:
Science/Math Concentration

Transferring credits back to Northwestern College

Most students will have completed all major and Northwestern Core requirements before transferring to Washington. Additional credits taken at Washington will transfer back to Northwestern to complete graduation requirements.


Transferring to Iowa State University

Northwestern pre-engineering students interested in transferring to Iowa State University should take the following courses, all of which will be accepted for their equivalent at Iowa State. Such transfer usually occurs after spending two years at Northwestern. Iowa State currently offers 14 different engineering degree programs. Completion of one of these programs will likely take another 2½ to 3 years at ISU. (Students interested in transferring to a university other than Iowa State should meet with Northwestern's pre-engineering adviser.)

Recommended courses:

CHE 111 - General Chemistry
An introductory course in chemistry that emphasizes physical and inorganic concepts, problems and calculations. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gases, thermochemistry, theories of atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The general chemistry sequence (Chemistry 111 and Chemistry 112) is recommended for students with good math / science preparations who intend to proceed to advanced courses in chemistry, the biological sciences or engineering. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and ACT math score of at least 24 (SAT 570 or above). (4 credits)
CHE 112 - General Chemistry
A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry.Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor.(4 credits)
CSC 171QR - Computer Science I
(4 credits) (NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning) This is the first in a two-semester sequence of courses that introduces students to fundamental aspects of the field of computing; focusing on problem-solving, software design concepts and their realization as computer programs. Topics include procedural abstraction, control structures, iteration, data types and their representation. An introduction to a high-level language, for the purpose of gaining mastery of these principles, will be provided in lectures and hands-on laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 510 or above), or a passing score on the MAT090 placement exam.
ECO 214 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics concerns itself with economic aggregates such as inflation, unemployment, recessions, national debt, and income inequality international trades. Macroeconomic models will be introduced. These models will be used to understand the application of monetary and fiscal policy. (4 credits)
ENG 184 - College Writing
An introduction to academic writing, emphasizing the writing process. Students learn strategies for pre-writing, drafting, and revising of expository essays. The course includes analysis of model essays and discussion of model essays and an introduction to research-based writing. (4 credits)
MAT 112QR - Calculus I
(4 credits) (NWCore option under Quantitative Reasoning) This course is a study of functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with a strong emphasis on both theory and applications. Note: Meets four times per week. Prerequisites: C- or higher in MAT109, or an ACT math score of at least 24 (SAT 570 or above), or permission of mathematics department chair.
MAT 211 - Calculus II
A study of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integration, sequences, series, polar coordinates and conic sections.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT112 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
MAT 212 - Calculus III
A study of the cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, vectors in two dimensions and three dimensions, vector valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector calculus.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT211 or permission of instructor.(4 credits)
MAT 312 - Differential Equations
A study of the elementary theory, methods of solution, and applications of differential equations, which may include topics such as first order ordinary differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, series solutions, variation of parameters, Laplace Transforms, linear systems, partial differential equations, and Fourier Series.Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT211 or permission of department chair.(3 credits)
PHY 211SN - Classical Physics I
(4 credits)(NWCore option under Science and the Natural World) Though all students are welcome in this calculus-based, IGE physics course, this is the first of a two course sequence designed for math, science, and engineering majors and others who have taken or are taking calculus and intend to apply to medical or graduate school. This course includes the following topics: kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, gravity, oscillations, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MAT 112, or consent of the department chair.
PHY 212 - Classical Physics II
A continuation of Classical Physics I. Topics will include simple harmonic oscillation, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetism.Prerequisite: successful completion of PHY211 with a grade of C- or better.(4 credits)
SOC 202x - Social Problems
A discussion of myths and facts leading toward an understanding of many social problems, such as sexual deviance, drugs and alcohol, health care and illness (physical and mental), crime and delinquency, violence, wealth and poverty, inequality of opportunity, work, aging, sex inequality, racial minorities and discrimination, education, family problems, war, pollution, ecology and population. Emphasis is placed upon difficulties in defining, critiquing and proposing meaningful solutions.(4 credits)
SOC 290CC - Cultural Anthropology
(4 credits)(NWCore option under Cross-Cultural Engagement) This course is about learning a way of seeing and understanding other cultures and our own culture(s) - introducing and drawing on ideas and insights from the field of Cultural Anthropology. In a globalizing and increasingly interconnected world these ideas and insights can serve a critical need in helping us understand and learn how to live in with cultural diversity and complexity. Thus the value of this course is in learning a new way of seeing and understanding, a way that helps us think about what it means to be human, a way that helps us understand and live with our neighbors -- locally and globally.

Total credits recommended: 51

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